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They hate us for our toothpaste!

I’m flying from Boston to Seattle this Saturday, then the return trip a week later. To ease the process, I packed a small suitcase, so that I could go through the entire trip without having to check a bag.

Then, the TSA imposes a ban on “all beverages, shampoo, suntan lotion, creams, tooth paste, hair gel, and other items of similar consistency” in carry-on baggage. In other words, if you’re travelling with toothpaste (and that’s the only way to travel when your mother is a dentist), your option is to check your bag. Hassle-free flight is a dream from the past, apparantly.

This is asinine. This is the sort of rampant paranoia which I find hard to believe. This is cutting off your nose because it had a zit on it.

I arrived back in this country a week ago and already I wish I lived somewhere else.

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4 Comments

Comment by anonymous
2006-08-11 06:19:53

lived somewhere else: such as in Britain, which has banned ALL carry-on luggage for now, regardless of contents?

 
Comment by walligowdy
2006-08-11 12:08:02

Gotta love paranoia. If it would make things easier, I have toothpaste and shampoo that you can use while you’re here. You’d be on your own for hair gel, but you could always buy some after you get here.

 
Comment by kiismet
2006-08-30 17:49:22

No US bashing. I know you’re not a huge fan, but better safe than sorry & whoever posted anonymously is right – Britain is being far stricter. The US will get back to less restricted list once they’ve come up with a better detection system for this new liquid threat. Trust me, 9/11 was devastating enough – I will never, ever forget the smell in the air here, the fact that we had no TV and hardly any radio b/c it was all broadcast from the towers, how impossible it was to get a cell phone call through w/ the loss of cell towers & the constant calls from people fearing the worst blocking the remaining ones, the friends who were EMTs who went down to the staging area & helped out, the fact that my mom was mandated to stay at the hospital as it was the nearest non Manhattan hospital & it was where they determined the overflow of injured people would be sent (however, this overflow never came, they only pulled 20 people out alive), the fear everyone in my school felt knowing they knew at least one person who worked in or close to the towers, the tears at the dozen or so funeral masses & memorial services we attended for those we knew who were lost. I’ll do whatever is asked of me when flying, however silly it may seem, in hopes that I will never see a repeat of that day. Perhaps it didn’t hit as hard it areas that were further away, perhaps it did. I know it hit me very hard though & it hits me again everytime someone seems to dismiss how incredibl tragic it really was & how easily it could happen again without precautions. Unfortunately, there are a lot of sick people in the world today. If this means increased security measures, yes, it makes me mad that they are destroying liberties & freedoms I had, but it makes me feel better to know that authorities jump on these threats & do their best to prevent further tragedy from striking.

 
Comment by coriolinus
2006-08-30 18:58:19

Yes, Britain is far stricter–I’d be getting on their case, except I don’t live there and don’t plan to.

Better safe than sorry? Terrorism is a vastly inflated threat in the US, and I just don’t want to deal with the paranoia. Too many of the “security” measures which plague contemporary air travel are completely ineffective, having been implemented more for peace of mind than actual security.

I’m not saying that terrorist attacks aren’t horrible things; just that the national reaction has been a huge success for the terrorists. People fear to fly without absurd, ineffective “precautions.” It’s considered a somewhat radical breakthrough when it turns out the government actually is required to obey its own laws.

Read this article. If you want to live in a state of paranoia, that’s up to you–I just don’t want to give up my own freedoms to accomodate that.

 

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